Stephen Arnold Music

The Most Heard, Least Known Composers In America

Everywhere I Go – Mega Guitar (and Uke) Giveaway!

UPDATE:  We have our winners!

Watch, Then Enter to Win One of Three Stunning Guitars!

We’ve NEVER done anything like this before! Here’s THREE chances to win a cool instrument, just by listening and commenting on our our brand-new multiplatform/social image package: “Everywhere I Go.”

1) First prize: Get your inner rockabilly on with this spectacular orange Gretsch 5420 Electromatic guitar.
2) Next up: A stunning Martin Koa Wood Acoustic/Electric guitar. Amaze your friends with your James Taylor covers!
3) Lastly: It seems EVERYONE is strumming a uke these days, so third place is an Oscar Schmidt Koa Wood Baritone Ukulele. You’ll be the hit of the campfire!


To enter, just listen to the demo of our brand-new multiplatform/social image package: “Everywhere I Go,” and leave a comment below. We’ll print out all the comments, and draw three of them at random from our famous mystery fishbowl. Those three lucky winners will each take home one of these spectacular stringed instruments!

View more samples of “Everywhere I Go” here »

Drawing to be held on Thursday, September 29, 2016.  Click here for full contest rules and regulations.

*Note: all comments are moderated and may take up to 24 hours to appear.

Good luck!

Station Summit 2016 – Guitar Gods Giveaway and a SAM JAM!



The annual Promax Station Summit is upon us, and Stephen Arnold Music (SAM) will be there with the best music in the local broadcast television industry!

If you are attending the conference at The Mirage in Las Vegas, then stop by and check out our guitar display. This year it’s a Guitar Gods Giveaway and we’re giving away all 4 guitars on display: a Jimi Hendrix Stratocaster, a Jimmy Page Danelectro, an Eric Clapton Stratocaster, and a Stevie Ray Vaughn Stratocaster!

So make plans to stop by, have a chat, drop your card in the box and maybe walk away with one of these legendary guitars. The drawing is Thursday, June 23rd around 4:00pm, during the “Networking Break”. Remember, you must be present to win.

Thursday night, don’t miss our 6th annual “After Hours SAM JAM,” featuring the sensational Byron Bordeaux. This year we’ll be jammin’ at Elton John’s FIZZ Bar at Caeser’s Palace along with our many station friends from across the country from 9 p.m. until midnight!

Good luck and hope to see you kickin’ it with us in Vegas… baby!

Click here for more info about Station Summit »

“Can I borrow a couple of your favorite guitars for a few days?”

I remember back in the summer of 2011 getting a call from Texas photographer Chris Fritchie. “I have this idea,” began our phone conversation, “May I borrow a couple of your favorite guitars for a few days? . . . Trust me,” he said.  Chris has a passion for music – especially guitars – and what he always loved about talking “guitars” with me was that it was never about the most expensive or unique guitar, but rather how these instruments capture a moment, a place in time. . .


So he came by and I gave him two of my favorites – my 1934 Martin 018 and a 1969 Fender Strat. Then a few days later he called and asked, “by the way, are there any stories behind these guitars?”


I’d never really thought about the stories behind those guitars, but all at once the memories kicked in and I recalled how I got that ’69 Strat. In late July 2005, about a month before Hurricane Katrina, I was in New Orleans for some sessions for WWL-TV and found that Strat at a vintage music store.  Two things are special to me about this Fender:

1) I probably saved that guitar’s life, because the music store was destroyed a month later during Katrina (I’ve named the guitar Katrina… My favorite guitars all have names.)

2) I used the guitar playing all of the sonic logo harmonics on the Weather Channel’s “Storm Alert.”

“I Saved This Guitar’s Life” 1969 Fender Stratocaster

Then I recalled how I got the ’34 Martin which I always called my Wedding Guitar. I was best man at a close friend’s wedding in North Carolina, and we decided to take a detour that nearly made us miss the whole event. The morning of the ceremony, the groom insisted on driving out to an old barn he had heard about located “somewhere in North Carolina.” It allegedly housed a massive stock of vintage Martin and Gibson guitars. The wedding started at 4 p.m., and we made it back with a whopping 30 minutes to spare, looking a bit worse for wear. The marriage didn’t last, but I still have the Martin I bought that day. My “wedding guitar” rings like a bell, and has been pushed into service many times since then appearing on dozens of music packages.

“My Favorite Martin” 1934 Martin 018

“My Favorite Martin” 1934 Martin 018

After that, Chris thought it would be interesting to tell the story of Stephen Arnold Music against the backdrop of my guitar collection; not to “show off” the guitars, but to simply celebrate an amazing journey and share a life-long passion.


He always said: “The love is clear . . . who really has their first guitar?!”


It was a rare opportunity and we both seized the day.  I supplied the stories, memories and anecdotes, while the instruments helped illustrate the journey.  Chris’s images comprise a unique collection of art, all based around a simple 6-string . . . with a few 8 and 12 strings thrown in for fun.  All guitars were photographed on location throughout the United States, documenting a journey that goes back nearly half a century.


Thus began The Story Of Six Strings .


2015 – Is it Over Yet?

Whew! 2015 was the hottest year on record. And things really heated up as well for all of us here at Stephen Arnold Music with new, exciting musical branding projects for some top corporations, news and sports networks and live attractions.

Successful branding is all about making emotional connections. Music is the fastest way to evoke an emotional response, and the most efficient way for a brand to associate itself with those responses. We call it “sonic branding.” And in today’s highly mobile and social media context, consumers are more apt to share messages and content that make them feel something. Music acts as the emotional “glue” that helps bind people together.

A great example is the new theme song we created for the MeTV Network. It’s an addictive, modern spin on swing music tied to the tag line ”That’s Memorable, That’s Me.” Once you see the pictures with the words, it make an indelible impression, compelling you to watch the great TV shows on MeTV that we all grew up with. It’s an infectious, fun campaign, and we loved working on it. Take a listen:

The gripping, real-life drama portrayed in the CNBC show “Shark Tank” can really get your blood boiling, and it needs a high-energy audio formula to help drive viewers to watch it. We put together a funky, rhythm-driven track with original “Shark Tank Nation” lyrics to help get the party started. It’s another terrific example of the music matching and driving the intense, competitive nature of the show’s brand. We think you’ll agree:

Politics seem to be on EVERYONE’S minds these days…including ours! To help launch the “State of the Union” program with Jake Tapper, CNN came to us once again looking for a bold, confident musical signature and theme. This new show interviews top newsmakers on policy and politics, so it needed some audio “gravitas” to help establish credibility. It became a great opportunity to blend live orchestration, modern percussion and guitars into a compelling and memorable theme, helping shape the show’s new identity for viewers. Listen up:

2015 also marked the launch of some new cable channels, including “Decades Television Network.” They needed some solid sonic branding. We were more than happy to provide them with an extensive musical package based on a 4-note sonic logo. It became a lush, multi-style collection, giving the network a wide range of themes around which they could promote their unique blend of entertainment and history. Check it out:

Sometimes you just can’t afford a brand-new, custom piece of music, but need something dramatic and memorable right now. ESPN Deptortes found an existing track on our production library, “The Vault” to promote the 2015 Pan Am Games. It’s big, bold…and it’s beautiful:

Sometimes you just need a new musical theme to appeal to a billion people. That’s right – one BILLION! Well, China Central Television International (CCTV) has a worldwide audience that size. This was a fascinating and massive project, involving rebranding their five international channels. Now THAT’s a big job! But we were up to it, composing themes for CCTV’s English, French (African), Spanish, Russian and Arabic audiences. Want sonic brand variety? You’ll find it right here:

Hey, it’s not ALL about TV! One of the more exciting projects we tackled this year was for “Philly From the Top”, a fun, experiential 57 floor elevator ride to the One Liberty Building observation deck. During the trip and at the top, riders are exposed to the fascinating story of the history of Philadelphia through visuals, sounds and special effects. We created the sound design for each area of the attraction. It was great fun, as SAM audio gurus Paul West, Whitney Arnold and Jesus Garcia made several trips to Philly to oversee the audio implementation. It was a unique chance to create sonic branding and musical content in a completely new environment for us. Though it’s not as cool as being there, you can sample it here:

it’s been a big year, right? And we’re working on more exciting projects for 2016 right now. The science and artistry of creating memorable audio experiences has always fascinated us. Just try and imagine the soundtrack of your life without the memorable music that accompanies it in your mind. It’s powerful. It’s pervasive. It’s indelible. And it’s what we do everyday here at Stephen Arnold Music.

View the 2015 Stephen Arnold Music montage here:

Right-Handed Lefties and Left-Handed Righties…My obsession with Hendrix and upside down Stratocasters

As many of you know, Jimi Hendrix was left-handed, but played a right-handed Fender Stratocaster – turned upside down! I’ve always been fascinated with not only the sound of Hendrix on that right-handed upside-down Strat, but with the way it looked as well. There’s something about the whammy bar on top and the tuners on the bottom.  I was really intrigued, so number of years ago I bought a righty Strat, turned it upside-down and restrung it. This was definitely the closest I’d ever come to sounding like Hendrix! I even had a friend “distress” it to make it look like it was 50+ years old, and went so far as to put cigarette burns on the headstock. (see me with my Strat below)

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Well, I never actually knew what made his distinctive sound so unique. Then I ran across this article in Popular Mechanics magazine about how flipping and restringing a standard right-handed Fender Stratocaster fundamentally changes the string tension and microphone location. That’s what produced Hendrix’s signature mix of bright highs and delicate lows.


Here are the highlights:


  • The rear pickup on the traditional Stratocaster is intentionally slanted – capturing the higher strings near their base – where they have a more piercing tone. On Hendrix’s guitar, it catches the higher strings farther up, so instead of shrieking, they sing.


  • Guitar pickups are mini-microphones, with a pole magnet aligned below each string. And the distance between the magnet and the string varies for each string. But by reversing the orientation of the traditional Stratocaster, Hendrix changed which strings were closest to their magnets, and consequently, most prominent in the mix. Pretty crazy stuff.


  • Conversely, Hendrix’s low strings were comparatively tighter, which made them sound less booming and twangy.


  • On a traditional Strat, the highest strings (E, B) are the longest. When turned upside-down, they become the shortest, so they don’t have to be pulled as tightly to be in tune. For Hendrix, that made them easier to bend, like on “All Along the Watchtower.”


  • Fender’s headstock design makes every string a different length, so restringing the guitar upside-down changed which strings were longest. This altered the subtle overtones produced by vibrations on the unplayed part of the string above the top of the neck, near the tuning keys.


What’s really amazing is that I doubt Hendrix ever thought about any of this. He just had a tough time finding a decent left-handed guitar, especially back in the day. So Instead, he snagged a cool Strat , flipped it over, restrung it, and ta-da! The rest is history.